LAWeekly Education Guide 2014 : Page 2

www.laweekly.com // OctOber 3-9, 2014 // LA WEEKLY | 2 | TRADE UP CAREER & EDuCATION SPECIAL SECtIon ed-u-ca-tion‘14 GUIDE written by Paul rogers SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS OFFER KEYS TO NEW CAREERS director of the Educa-tional Research Center of America. “It doesn’t mat-ter if its office automation, inventory systems, online purchasing, or cloud mi-gration. We see the need for a strong computer-focused workforce -and such a need will only continue to grow as con-cerns for online security and worries about cyber terrorism continue.” Daniel Newell photo credit Jessica Juliao While many tech positions require appropriate four-year degrees, this huge sector also offers opportunities for individuals with less formal education. “Some common open positions that do not necessarily require a degree are IT, software developers, mobile app devel-W hile the U.S employment market overall remains uncertain (the unemployment rate was little changed at 6.1 percent in August, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), there are nonetheless a number of thriving job sectors. Many of the positions in these booming fields don’t even require a four-year degree. We spoke to four careers experts about where the work is, and how vocational schools can help job seekers get a foothold in these growth industries, quickly (with one-or two-year cer-tificate and associate programs rather than four-year degrees) and affordably (the average trade school degree costs $33,000, compared to $127,000 for a bachelor’s degree). HEALTH CARE Since the Affordable Care Act (commonly called “Obam-acare”) was signed into law in 2010, the health care industry has added nearly one million jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of US News & World Report’s “100 Best Jobs of 2014” are in this field. More Americans with health insurance under Obamacare means more paying customers for providers, which mean addi-tional staff required to accommodate the influx. This phenom-enon, married to an aging “baby boomer” generation, makes health care a super-hot sector for job seekers. While many health care positions require a college degree, the rapid expansion of the sector has created an array of non-degree employment opportunities. “Many health-related trade schools can provide the training and certification required to get started in this industry,” said Daniel Newell, program manager of workforce/economic development for the Career Center at San Jose State Univer-sity. “Some examples are medical assisting, phlebotomy, and radiology. “However, some of these roles are hard to obtain due to the saturation of individuals in the workforce who have these cer-tifications. As health care services expand, the over saturated talent pipeline will hopefully balance itself out.” Administrative courses such as business office technology, accounting, health science, medical technology, and medical administration can also offer individuals opportunities within the health care field, said Newell. “Nurses can begin their education at trade school, getting their associates degree or technical degree, and then moving forward with their education as they desire,” said Claudine Vainrub, Principal of EduPlan. “The first step to become a nurse is receiving their AS [Associate of Science degree] in nursing. This step can be completed at a community college, a trade school or a vocational school.” TECHNOLOGY “The computer field remains hot, as virtually every sector is increasing its focus on technology,” said Ed Doody, executive “Schools that offer training in early childhood education, general counseling, and education are appropriate choices,” said Newell. Early childhood education training is very hands-on and can be completed in just one or two years. As well as paving the way to early childhood educator positions in schools, pre-schools and daycares, such vocational certificate and associate programs can also lead to entry-level teacher’s aide roles. A traditionally high turnover rate combined with greater emphasis being place on the education of children at an early age (early childhood education focuses on children between the ages of 0-5) mean that work is out there in both existing positions and imminent new jobs. As demand for pre-school professional is growing at roughly equal rates nationwide, states with more rapidly increasing populations, such as California, will offer greater employment opportunities for qualified early childhood educators. CONSTRUCTION According to figures released by BLS last month, employment in construction edged up by 20,000 in August, and over the past 12 months, job growth in the industry has averaged 19,000 Ed Doody per month. Since reaching an employment trough in January 2011, the industry has recovered 636,000 jobs – equivalent to nearly 28 percent of the jobs lost during the prior employment downturn. “Construction remains a strong growth field,” said Doody. “With each generation, construction and building trades have long been identified as a ‘hot’ field, and it is no different today. Now, we are seeing an increase in opportunity as the housing sector continues to recover economically and there is a greater demand to refresh our national infrastructure in general.” After the construction industry wilted in 2008, many skilled workers left the field and have not returned. Simultaneously, many of those who stayed on were older and are now headed for retirement. These factors have resulted in new construction job openings (the Associated Builders and Contractors trade association estimates the construction industry is facing a shortage of almost 2 million skilled workers by the end of the decade). In-demand construction trades include plumbing, electrical, and heating/air conditioning. Trade schools such as Los Ange-les Trade-Technical College offer training in these specialties as well other construction skills including carpentry, solar thermal installation, and welding. “Some common open positions that do not necessarily require a degree are IT, software developers, mobile app developers, cyber security technicians, [and] sales/ marketing,” – Newell opers, cyber security technicians, [and] sales/marketing,” said Newell. “Vocational training and applied experience can go a long way when companies are in a bind for talent.” California employs the most technology professionals of any U.S. state, with tech employment in San Francisco back to levels not seen since the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s. “Because of the continually changing technology, a trade school that specializes exclusively in the computer sciences – and cutting edge techniques -is a must,” said Sunil Sani, Founder and CEO of CareerGlider.com. “Many offer online course loads, so go with a school that’s built a reputation in the industry and among employers [such as] ITT Technical Institute [and] Capella University.” EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Los Angeles Unified School District expects to hire almost twice as many teachers during the current school year as in 2013-14. While most teaching positions require at least a bach-elor’s degree, trade schools can still offer a first step toward a career in education.

Trade Up

Paul Rogers

VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS OFFER KEYS TO NEW CAREERS

While the U.S employment market overall remains uncertain (the unemployment rate was little changed at 6.1 percent in August, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), there are nonetheless a number of thriving job sectors. Many of the positions in these booming fields don’t even require a four-year degree.

We spoke to four careers experts about where the work is, and how vocational schools can help job seekers get a foothold in these growth industries, quickly (with one- or two-year certificate and associate programs rather than four-year degrees) and affordably (the average trade school degree costs $33,000, compared to $127,000 for a bachelor’s degree).

HEALTH CARE

Since the Affordable Care Act (commonly called “Obamacare”) was signed into law in 2010, the health care industry has added nearly one million jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of US News & World Report’s “100 Best Jobs of 2014” are in this field.

More Americans with health insurance under Obamacare means more paying customers for providers, which mean additional staff required to accommodate the influx. This phenomenon, married to an aging “baby boomer” generation, makes health care a super-hot sector for job seekers.

While many health care positions require a college degree, the rapid expansion of the sector has created an array of nondegree employment opportunities.

“Many health-related trade schools can provide the training and certification required to get started in this industry,” said Daniel Newell, program manager of workforce/economic development for the Career Center at San Jose State University. “Some examples are medical assisting, phlebotomy, and radiology.

“However, some of these roles are hard to obtain due to the saturation of individuals in the workforce who have these certifications. As health care services expand, the over saturated talent pipeline will hopefully balance itself out.”

Administrative courses such as business office technology, accounting, health science, medical technology, and medical administration can also offer individuals opportunities within the health care field, said Newell.

“Nurses can begin their education at trade school, getting their associates degree or technical degree, and then moving forward with their education as they desire,” said Claudine Vainrub, Principal of EduPlan. “The first step to become a nurse is receiving their AS [Associate of Science degree] in nursing. This step can be completed at a community college, a trade school or a vocational school.”

TECHNOLOGY

“The computer field remains hot, as virtually every sector is increasing its focus on technology,” said Ed Doody, executive director of the Educational Research Center of America. “It doesn’t matter if its office automation, inventory systems, online purchasing, or cloud migration. We see the need for a strong computer focused workforce - and such a need will only continue to grow as concerns for online security and worries about cyber terrorism continue.” While many tech positions require appropriate four-year degrees, this huge sector also offers opportunities for individuals with less formal education.

“Some common open positions that do not necessarily require a degree are IT, software developers, mobile app developers, cyber security technicians, [and] sales/marketing,” said Newell. “Vocational training and applied experience can go a long way when companies are in a bind for talent.” California employs the most technology professionals of any U. S. state, with tech employment in San Francisco back to levels not seen since the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s. “Because of the continually changing technology, a trade school that specializes exclusively in the computer sciences – and cutting edge techniques - is a must,” said Sunil Sani, Founder and CEO of CareerGlider.com. “Many offer online course loads, so go with a school that’s built a reputation in the industry and among employers [such as] ITT Technical Institute [and] Capella University.”

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Los Angeles Unified School District expects to hire almost twice as many teachers during the current school year as in 2013-14. While most teaching positions require at least a bachelor’s degree, trade schools can still offer a first step toward a career in education.

“Schools that offer training in early childhood education, general counseling, and education are appropriate choices,” said Newell.

Early childhood education training is very hands-on and can be completed in just one or two years. As well as paving the way to early childhood educator positions in schools, preschools and daycares, such vocational certificate and associate programs can also lead to entry-level teacher’s aide roles.

A traditionally high turnover rate combined with greater emphasis being place on the education of children at an early age (early childhood education focuses on children between the ages of 0-5) mean that work is out there in both existing positions and imminent new jobs.

As demand for pre-school professional is growing at roughly equal rates nationwide, states with more rapidly increasing populations, such as California, will offer greater employment opportunities for qualified early childhood educators.

CONSTRUCTION

According to figures released by BLS last month, employment in construction edged up by 20,000 in August, and over the past 12 months, job growth in the industry has averaged 19,000 per month. Since reaching an employment trough in January 2011, the industry has recovered 636,000 jobs – equivalent to nearly 28 percent of the jobs lost during the prior employment downturn.

“Construction remains a strong growth field,” said Doody. “With each generation, construction and building trades have long been identified as a ‘hot’ field, and it is no different today. Now, we are seeing an increase in opportunity as the housing sector continues to recover economically and there is a greater demand to refresh our national infrastructure in general.”

After the construction industry wilted in 2008, many skilled workers left the field and have not returned. Simultaneously, many of those who stayed on were older and are now headed for retirement. These factors have resulted in new construction job openings (the Associated Builders and Contractors trade association estimates the construction industry is facing a shortage of almost 2 million skilled workers by the end of the decade).

In-demand construction trades include plumbing, electrical, and heating/air conditioning. Trade schools such as Los Angeles Trade-Technical College offer training in these specialties as well other construction skills including carpentry, solar thermal installation, and welding.

Read the full article at http://digitalissue.laweekly.com/article/Trade+Up/1830674/228173/article.html.

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